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Digital 3000

Social Media Ethics Made Easy

Social Media Ethics Made Easy: How to Comply With FTC Guidelines

Joseph W. Barnes

E-book Price: $19.95
Number of Pages:  120
Print ISBN:  9781606498521
E-book ISBN:  9781606498538

book Barnes Book Flyer.png NEW URL

Social Media Ethics Made Easy takes an in-depth look at the risks of social, digital and mobile media marketing without structured policies. Readers will learn what is at stake from the law to their reputation, and what happens if businesses and/or individuals do not disclose relationships or comply with (FTC) Federal Trade Commission regulations. Readers will come to understand what they should do, why, and how they should do it.

The issues in this book affect every single business from for-profits, to nonprofits, to government and educational institutions. It also addresses the impact on every single social/digital media participant and why they must learn about these guidelines so they can protect their own personal brand. This book is intended for a broad audience including students and professors in both undergrad and graduate schools, and practicing business executives. The goal is to inform management practice and help current and future business leaders navigate through the ethical laws and compliance issues affecting social, digital and mobile media.

Coming soon to Facebook: Video ads that follow you from device to device

Coming soon to Facebook: Video ads that follow you from device to device

Advertisers on Facebook see the emerging method of sequential mobile advertising as a way to better control their branding message with consumers on social media.

Sequential video advertising allows marketers to place targeted video ads in front of a user when they click an ad on their mobile device. Based on what the person clicks, and what the product or message is, marketers are then able to follow up with similar video ads as they hop from one device to another.

By creating a sequence of targeted ads, marketers can build up a pitch from one video to the next — starting with a “pitch” video and ending with a “sell” video intended to close the sale.

VentureBeat spoke to two sources who requested their names not be used because the information they were describing was based in conversations with Facebook executives.

“Video is where its going,” an advertising executive who works with Facebook told VentureBeat. “With unique profile IDs, you have the ability to better sequentially target content for users as they embark on their journey through the social media funnel.”

The same executive added: “Sequential video advertisers gives marketers the ability to place different messages that can build upon each other. This gives you greater control over the delivery of your message.”

Another mobile executive who works with Facebook told VentureBeat that advertisers want to better control, and deploy, product messages. But they are content, for now, in permitting Facebook and others obtain user data to target their ads.

For its part, Facebook uses a combination of its own in-house analytics and partners for the task of ad targeting.

Facebook is able to amass tremendous amounts of user data based on information contained in in its users’ profiles as well as their activity. That includes information on who you interact with and where you like to shop, for example. That data is gold to advertisers, keen to take advantage of Facebook’s 1.2 billion users.

“The writing is on the wall. Sequentially targeted ads are hugely efficient and ultimately cost effective. They have greater relevance for advertisers and better targeting,” said the second source, who has knowledge of Facebook’s mobile ad strategy.

“Anecdotally, it’s very promising. Facebook is putting a lot of effort into it,” the same source added.

Indeed, Facebook bought the video advertising outfit Liverail for an undisclosed sum earlier this month. Liverail’s technology optimizes video ad deliveries for mobile devices utilizing bidding and proprietary data. Liverail was considering an IPO this year but threw in its lot with Facebook instead, media reports said.

A Facebook spokesperson declined to comment on the Liverail deal because it hasn’t closed yet. The spokesperson told VentureBeat that the social media giant began incorporating video ads into user feeds years ago but that in March, the company unveiled Premium Video for advertisers.

Video ads are an important component of Facebook’s market strategy. You can see a blog post on the subject here.

The two mobile executives said Premium Video Ads was a definite upgrade to earlier iterations of mobile video ads and that the company was focused on evolving their mobile ad technology with better tools for advertisers. And they both pointed to discussions with Facebook executives that the company is tweaking and testing new forms of mobile ad deployments likely to be unveiled by years end.

A blog post announcing Premium Video Ads put it this way:

“Premium Video Ads are designed for advertisers who want to reach a large audience with high-quality sight, sound and motion. Each 15-second video ad will start playing without sound as it appears on screen and stop if people scroll past. If people tap the video, it will expand into a full-screen view and sound will start. People can expect to begin seeing these new ads over the next few months.”

Facebook’s analytics and targeting capabilities are second to none, the sources both said. The sources told VentureBeat that the exceptionally detailed information on Facebook’s 1.2 billion users is ripe for the unveiling of upgraded targeted and video ads that possess many factors of consumers, including where they live, shop, and eat.

“It’s all in the context. Facebook knows more about you than Google does. They know who you’re friends and family are, and what kind of hair gel you use. They’re saying ‘we have more information on you and we know everything,” the second source said.

Facebook VP of ad product marketing Brian Boland hinted at the future of video ads in a blog post July 2heralding the Liverail purchase:

“We believe that LiveRail, Facebook and the premium publishers it serves have an opportunity to make video ads better and more relevant for the hundreds of millions of people who watch digital video every month. More relevant ads will be more interesting and engaging to people watching online video, and more effective for marketers too. Publishers will benefit as well because more relevant ads will help them make the most out of every opportunity they have to show an ad.”

“Sequential content delivery in ads sends a top-level message to consumers that brands know who they are. The reach and frequency of video ads allows Facebook the ability to reach out to users more effectively. Video is very powerful, and Facebook is committed to that pipeline of direct response,” the first source told VentureBeat.

At Facebook’s F8 conference in April, the company unveiled Audience Network, its enhanced advertising platform, furthering cementing the social media kingpin’s belief that mobile video ads are another important way to increase their share of the mobile ad pie.

Facebook has made solid strides into its mobile ad strategy over the last year alone. A study by TGB Digital showed Facebook’s ad click-through rate is four times higher than arch-rival Twitter’s, with 1.1 percent compared to Twitter’s 0.266 mobile CTR.

And at the F8 conference, Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg declared that his company had become a mobile-first player.

 

The Value of Social Media During Major Disasters

While millions of people are being affected by the storm Sandy, we are seeing the value of social media. On Twitter #Sandy has seen more than 4-million mentions with a potential reach of 3-billion followers. (Radian6).

Courtesy NY Daily News
USA Today reports that “Hurricane Sandy” was the top phrase on Facebook in the USA in the past 24 hours.
The Associated Press and USA Today report that on the mobile photo sharing site Instagram, there were 233,000 photos with the hashtag “Sandy,” 100,000 under “Hurricanesandy” and 20,000 under “Frankenstorm” as of Monday afternoon. 
Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom says, “There are now 10 pictures per second being posted with the hashtag ‘Sandy.”

What this means is that people have been turning to social media for information, they have been sharing information and photos, they have been using social media to check on family and friends, and they have been using these platforms to send good wishes people on the East Coast. 

The Mobile-Social Mom!

“According to a new eMarketer report, “The Mobile-Social Mom: Speeding the Trend Toward ‘Mobile First’,” if you want to know who is moving over to mobile social media, look no further than mom. eMarketer estimates that as many as half of all moms with children under 18 in the household will use mobile devices to access social networks in 2012.”

“Moms more likely to own smartphones, tablets compared to general consumers.”

“Moms are on the leading edge of a behavioral shift that has marketers and social networks scrambling. They may soon become the first demographic group who will use the mobile phone or tablet more often than the computer to access social networks.”

The Truth About Online Engagement

Many people talk about online “engagement” yet few take the time to define the term, create a strategy to increase engagement, and create effective methods of measurement.

There are many definitions of online engagement but let’s keep this simple and use Facebook as an example. If your customers or potential customers “like” a post or respond with comments or questions, they are engaging with you. They latter is what you want.

It’s not about how many followers or the number of people who “Like” your page; it’s about the number of people who engage with you, your venue, your service, your products — your brand.

Engagement means creating community, having a two-way conversation, having a dialogue with your followers. It means they ask you questions, and they share ideas that relate to your brand and other followers.  It’s as if everyone is invited over for a big community festival at a park and everyone is sharing with each other. That’s engagement.

You can increase engagement by asking for it. If you are a restaurant or grocery store and you post a great recipe for dinner, ask people to send you photos how it tasted and what their version looked like. Ask them to send in and share similar recipes.

You can track engagement month to month, year to date, and that month year to year. The goal is to increase the comments and the engagement.

(c) Joseph Barnes  www.Digital3000.net

The Two Most Important Words in Social Media!

 

Remarkable Service

 

Two words that say it all. 

I can’t begin to tell you how many conferences I speak at, consulting sessions I have, training workshops I hold, classes I teach, in which people constantly want to know the “keys” (this means magic keys) to social media. 

 No matter how much you listen, no matter how well you use the social media tools, none of it matters unless every touch point in your organization provides “Remarkable Service.” That is, customer service so special they will go out of their way to tell others. They may share the story through word of mouth, on Facebook, Tweet, create a video for YouTube, etc.

The first step in every social media plan must be “remarkable customer service.” Why? You can be incredibly responsive on social media platforms, but if someone at your organizations treats a customer “average,” then that person walks away with nothing  to say about your organization. 

The first step, the weekly check, the monthly check, and the constant check, needs to be “remarkable” customer service. That means the best of anyone in your category or channel, at every single touch point. 

(c) Joseph Barnes, http://www.Digital3000.net

Why NBC Blew It With the Olympics: What if we put Twitter on taped delay?

Social networks are a BUZZ all over America today because NBC is delaying the Olympic coverage. So why is that different that past Olympics? Social Media.

Today, we are receiving news and sports alerts about Olympic results, pictures and comments on Facebook and Twitter, and by the time the TV broadcasts come on, we already know what has happened. So where does this leave people engaged in social media? Not happy!

Social media has changed everything. The problem is that despite all of the great planning and coverage by NBC, they didn’t anticipate and fully understand the power of real-time social media. We now live in a world where we expect to see and hear what we want, now, live, and in real time. Social media is real time. Therefore we expect to see the Olympic coverage now, in real time, not taped delay as in years past.

It’s time for the broadcast and cable networks to “listen” and understand what social media is truly about. It’s about real time news, real time collaboration, real time community.

My gosh, can you imagine if we put Twitter on taped delay?

(c) Joseph Barnes, www.Digital3000.net

This IS The Future of Books!

This is a must read for several reasons:
1. This book is the new wave of publishing. You need to experience how books should be written.
2. There is good content in this book.
In Do or Die, Razorfish chairman Clark Kokich shares his prescription for more effective marketing: moving from just saying things to your audience to actually doing things people find entertaining, useful, and relevant and relevance is the key.
Do or Die, is the first full-length business book published as an iPad app.
You can read Do or Die, listen to it, and watch video interviews with industry leaders, while looking into 8 case studies from enlightened marketers such as Nike, Coors, Virgin America, VW and others. When Do or Die references a company’s Twitter feed, Facebook page, or website, you can see them live right on the page.

See the demo here.

Important Facebook Change You Need to Know About!

The following is an NPR story that everyone should read, published today, June 25th. 
A key change was made to your Facebook profile recently that you may not have noticed yet. Facebook has replaced the primary email address users entered in their profile contact information with brand-new @facebook.com addresses. These addresses allow you to email external accounts from your Facebook inbox. Forbes first noticed the change:
“No one seems to want the Facebook inbox to be their main email account (with good reason). Facebook is trying to change that with a new little nudge. On your profile page, Facebook has taken the liberty of making your Facebook email your default contact address.”
LifeHacker has instructions on how to quickly change your primary email information back.
We asked Facebook to explain, and got a statement reminding us that the company announced back in April that it would update addresses “to make them consistent across our site.” Facebook says you can still choose which email contact information you want to show on your profile.
The Facebook statement continues:
“Ever since the launch of timeline, people have had the ability to control what posts they want to show or hide on their own timelines, and today we’re extending that to other information they post, starting with the Facebook address.”
There certainly was an April announcement, but it did not warn users that their default profile email address would be switched without their knowledge. When asked why there wasn’t an additional notification to users, or a repeat of the announcement as the changes were taking place, the spokesman did not respond.

Why Facebook Needs to Listen to Make Money!

For all of the billions of dollars we’ve been hearing about with Facebook lately. For all of the smart brainiacs working there. For all of the fabulous things they have created. The one thing that Facebook doesn’t get is how to place effective advertising that serves both users and advertisers.

There’s a very good reason that GM pulled $10-million in advertising from Facebook. There’s a good reason why I’ve heard from many other business owners who have pulled advertising.

Here’s why.

Do I really care that my friends have “liked” certain businesses? I’m on Facebook to socialize right now and there is — no joke — an ad for “Metamucil.” [No jokes please]  Now I have nothing against Metamucil but seriously. Am I really interested in that product while I’m sending birthday messages to my friends on Facebook?

Come on. Facebook has demographics deeper than oil rigs and yet they can’t figure out what I’m interested in?

The other ads below Metamucil were even less relevant and interesting.

The greater challenge for Facebook is to fully understand how and why people use Facebook. Hello! People go there to socialize, unlike Google where people search for a topic.

If I’m on Facebook to socialize, you would think the FB experts could figure out a better way to understand my interests in real time and place ads that are relevant, timely, and interesting.

If I’m writing and wishing people a Happy Birthday are there local businesses that want to reach me? Bakeries, cup cake bakers, card makers, anything related to birthdays.

If I post pictures about taking my kids to the zoo it seems like family-oriented venues would want their ads on my page right away. Maybe even Disney ads?

I could go on and on, but until Facebook becomes realistic about understanding that the web is a REAL TIME experience, their ads will languish off to the side. Google gets it; Facebook doesn’t.

I welcome your comments. joe@digital3000.net

(c) Joseph Barnes, http://www.Digital3000.net